The Four R’s of Athletic Recovery

by Thorne Research

 

Refuel to Rebuild energy stores, support psychological stress, and reduce the risk of illness.

Support healing and restore spent energy stores by consuming high-quality food sources of protein, or build your own protein and carbohydrate blend to support muscle protein and glycogen synthesis.

The amount you need of protein and carbohydrate should be individually customized based on your sport, the intensity and duration of your training or competition, your body composition goals, and your food tolerances and preferences.

 

Rehydrate to Restore fluid levels. Replace what is lost via sweat by slowly consuming water and or electrolyte solutions (such as Catalyte®) to ensure hydration is restored for the next round of training or competition.*

Monitor your body weight both pre- and post-training, your urine color, and, if the test is available, your urine specific gravity. Be cautious not to rely on thirst alone, which can be an unreliable indicator of hydration status.

Even mild dehydration can affect core temperature, rate of perceived exertion, and impair performance during training and competition, as well as rate of muscle protein synthesis afterward.

Rest to Recharge by monitoring sleep quantity and quality, hormones, and training schedule to reduce risk of overtraining.

Fatigued athletes are at risk of overtraining to compensate for lack of energy, which can significantly increase the risk of injury.

Strive for 8-10 hours of high-quality sleep each night. Maintain a sleep routine with a dark, quiet, cool room, and limited lighted screen time an hour before bed to improve sleep quality.

 

Repair and Recuperate by taking advantage of new research – use compression technology, cold immersion, massage, active recovery exercises, and clinically studied botanicals like Meriva® to support recovery and circulation and reduce soreness.*

Watch for signs of under-recovery, such as prolonged muscle or joint soreness, ongoing mental and physical fatigue, unusually poor performance and power output, and feelings of illness and lethargy.

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